How does having a hip replacement relate to business?

  • Understand your decision making process – Moving towards or moving away
  • Once you commit learn all you can 
  • Prepare for what is within your control
  • Ask for help even if you don’t think you need it
  • Take what is offered – this relates especially to headphones and pain relief
  • Adjust to your new reality
  • Plan for the future based on what is really important to you
  • Be grateful and thank everyone who has helped you succeed

Stopping in the middle of an access trail which is literally just that, access from ski runs above to ski runs below is the worse place to stop.  I, like many people relax a bit on access trails because they are easy and people should not be stopped on them. They are meant to be that cruisy little run back to the lift or lodge where you can just let your skiis go a bit, and enjoy. You get to the intersections and there are choices, lodge, lift, pub… lots of options.

I was in the unfortunate position of having crash landed into the middle of the intersection of the access trail. It was definitely not a good place to be. 

I mention this as sometimes in business we do not start from the best possible place or realise that we are starting in the middle of a place that could lead many directions.  I can confess this was certainly my experience. It is not so much where you start but quickly assessing that this is not the best place to be and taking immediate action to move!  Where can this access trail lead you? What are your options?

I was lying across the access trail feeling a bit dazed and trying to get up quickly.  I was pushing and pushing to get up and was just stuck in the middle of the access trail!  I was not shifting. Thank God for helmets – no-one could easily identify the person stopped in the worst possible place with seemingly little skill to change that.

Unbeknown to me when I fell the last thread of cartilage allowing that hip to function gave way and left me stuck on the access trail struggling to get up.  The more frustrated I got at myself the more stuck I seemed to be. Despite putting more pressure on my ski and my leg nothing was happening. It wasn’t helping that people were skiing past close and yelling back “bad place to stop” – OK maybe it was only one person but I immediately had it on full replay in my mind to berate myself as much as possible.  

How true is this of business.   We get a problem and we hone in on the specifics, losing the big picture.  

Solving complex business issues requires taking a holistic view of what is going on. 

My fall was the catalyst to realise I had major issues in my hip, hence why it was healing quickly and required a more complex approach. 

How does having a hip replacement relate to business?

In business we sometimes get stuck and with so many potential directions how do we choose.  

A coach is a great support with helping you in business to assess your choices and decide which path to follow. Click here for more information about coaching. 

 

  • Understand your decision making process – Moving towards or moving away

 

The first surgeon I went to started listing what I would not be able to do in the future.  He was what we call giving me the “move away from” list. The second surgeon talked about using the latest technology and the ability to move towards being able to do everything I had previously done.  Making decisions on what moves us forward is important in business and life. We may not notice but basing decisions on what we don’t want keeps us playing small and limits us.

 

  • Once you commit learn all you can 

 

Once I decided I was having major surgery I read all the research I could on how to best prepare. Things have changed enormously since I worked in Orthopaedics in the 1980s so I wanted to learn all I could about the latest technology. (I stopped short at watching an example of the surgical procedure on their website!)

When you go into business do your research.  Expand your knowledge as relying on our own knowledge networks will often mean you restricting yourself with unnoticed beliefs about what is possible or what we deserve.  The advances in technology also mean that unless we are continually learning and adapting we will be left well behind.  

 

  • Prepare for what is within your control

 

My fitness level was within my control before the operation so I gave it full priority.  Find out what are the key priorities for you to focus on. Write them down and arrange your routine around what you can control.  Be wary of losing hours on social media or email unless it is contributing to the success of your business. Time is a precious commodity so make sure you make conscious choices.   Think about your past week. Did you allocate time to your key priorities?

How did you plan for your week?  How did you measure your success.

I have been keeping track of my post op exercises daily to make sure I am recovering a small amount of movement and strength day by day. 

 

  • Ask for help even if you don’t think you need it.

 

I booked into the physio even though I had been given all the exercises.  He helped me just feel confident that I was on the right track.  

In business we often feel isolated and bear the burden of all the decision making.  Many people who engage a coach for the first time don’t really think they need it and then soon discover how valuable that support and help is. 

 

  • Take what is offered – this relates especially to headphones and pain relief

 

As I was wheeled into the waiting bay for surgery they offered me headsets.  I had just finished my medication with my own headphones in the pre – op area so declined the offer.  The orderly pressed me to take them but I wasn’t aware of why. Once he had left it became obvious that in the waiting bay next to the theatre you could hear everything being done to the patient who was the previous case.  Drilling, bashing, grinding – I was really wishing I had taken those headphones!

In business find out what support there is for you and when help is offered find the value in taking it. 

 

  • Adjust to your new reality

 

When you start a new business or a new endeavour it is like adapting to a new joint.  It takes time to get comfortable and you may have to adapt your step. Always give yourself plenty of adjustment time. Putting pressure on yourself to achieve too much too soon will have the effect of decreasing your creativity and productivity.  Good planning and realistic expectations will allow you to adapt positively to your new reality.

 

  • Plan for the future based on what is really important to you

 

You know what it is like.  You make a decision and everyone starts to give you well meaning advice.  It is easy for others to side track us if we are not clear on our own values and why we are embarking on a particular endeavour.   Make your choices based on what is important to you. 

Think of your ideal future and then map out the steps to create it.  I recently was presented with an opportunity that sounded great but when I stepped back and reflected on how it linked to what is most important for me now at this point in my life, it was easy to see it was not congruent with my plans for my ideal future. 

 

  • Be grateful and thank everyone who has helped you succeed

 

I am incredibly grateful to Patrick Weinrauch and his wonderful team and all the hospital staff at St Andrew’s Memorial.  We can feel very vulnerable when in hospital and kindness goes a long way. I am also very grateful to my wonderful husband John.  He has certainly exceeded his stair count this past 10 days going up and down to nurture his wife. 

 

In business and life so many people contribute to our success.  I know I am remiss at thanking people at times but to all my facilitators, coaches and to Dinda who has managed things while I have been out of action my sincerest thanks. 

 

Tomorrow we start our next Brisbane program and next month Melbourne.  

If you would like more details call Kathy on 04049686772 

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